Global Brigades

Global Brigades ( GB ) is the largest student-led, nonprofit health and sustainable development organization with North American and European universities. The organization states, that their participating students and professional volunteers are committed to sustainable communities in developing countries, while respecting local culture.

According to the organization’s website, more than 65,000 volunteers from over 800 universities and 1 million beneficiaries in 4 countries. Brigades usually consist of a minimum of 30 students who participate in 7 to 10 day brigades. There is usually a new university at brigade at each community every 3-4 months. The organization has concentrated its efforts on communities in Honduras , Panama , Nicaragua , and Ghana . [1]Various programs are designed to meet the needs of developing countries. Global Brigades currently has 7 different branches: public health, water, human rights, dental, engineering, business, and medical. The Global Brigades exits the community, where it is self-sustaining.

Global Brigades is based on the holistic model. [2]Before a community is chosen, Global Brigades will research a community of benefit from the program. Before volunteers arrives, Global Brigades officials will visit the community to discuss goals, expected outcomes, and responsibilities with the local population. Afterwards, the community is a partner of a Global Brigaders team, usually different volunteers from different universities. The communities get a visit from all seven branches of the brigade, with the idea being that the community’s development will be kept alive. Between different brigade visits, staff will visit the community to ensure the program is moving forward in the right direction. Even after the community has graduated and graduated from the program,

Criticism

The volunteering work of the organization is occasionally advertised with a strong focus on the single experience for young students in countries Somewhat exotic, less on the actual aid-work. This is sometimes referred to as voluntourism – a portmanteau of volunteering and tourism . [3] Most advertisement for the group is achieved through crowdsourcing on social mediaplatforms like Facebook and Instagram . There, the focus often lies on the inspirational pictures of volunteers, which is described as narcissistic and condescending. [4]These are some of the most important features of the world, and others are called the work of international organizations, they are not trained for; and some help work in a local area where you can work with local areas, where you can get more information on where to look. [5] [6] Extensive Criticism and the Assets and Drawbacks of Global Brigades, as performed by Global Brigades, has been published in peer review literature. [7] [8] [9] [10]

References

  1. Jump up^ “Partners for Change (globalbrigades.org)” . Retrieved 2017-12-08 .
  2. Jump up^ “The Largest Movement for Global Health and Holistic Development (globalbrigades.org)” . Retrieved 2017-12-08 .
  3. Jump up^ “6-Day Visit To Rural African Community Completely Changes Woman’s Facebook Profile Picture (theonion.com)” . Retrieved 2017-12-08 .
  4. Jump up^ “#InstagrammingAfrica: The Narcissism of Global Voluntourism (thesocietypages.org)” . Retrieved 2017-12-08 .
  5. Jump up^ “The Burdensome Case Against Medical Missions (gwglobalhealth.wordpress.com)” . Retrieved 2017-12-08 .
  6. Jump up^ “Acadia Global Brigades is a Farce: Leave it to Professionals (theath.ca)” . Retrieved 2017-12-08 .
  7. Jump up^ Bezruchka, Stephen (2006). “Medical Tourism as Medical Harm to the Third World: Why? For Whom?”,Wilderness and Environmental Medicine, 51 (78), 77-78
  8. Jump up^ Bishop, Rachel A. and Litch, James A. L (2000). “Medical Tourism Can Do Harm.”,British Medical Journal, 320, 1017
  9. Jump up^ Panosian, Claire and Coates, Thomas J. (2006). “The New Medical” Missionaries “- Grooming the Next Generation of Global Health Workers.”,New England Journal of Medicine, 354, 1771-1173
  10. Jump up^ Wolfberg, Adam J. (2006). “Volunteering Overseas – Lessons from Surgical Brigades.”,New England Journal of Medicine, 354 (5), 443-445

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