Orbis International

Orbis International is an international non-profit organization dedicated to saving sight worldwide. Its programs focus on the prevention of blindness and the treatment of blinding eye diseases in countries through hands-on training , public health education, advocacy and local partnerships. [1] Since 1982, Orbis capacity-building programs have enhanced the skills of 325,000 eye care and 23.3 million people in 92 countries. [2]

Orbis is a registered 501 (c) (3) tax-deductible non-profit charity in the United States. [3] It is rated 4 stars on Charity Navigator [3] and is a Guidestar Gold Participant. [4] It is headquartered in New York with offices in Toronto , London , Dublin , Hong Kong , Macau , Shanghai , Singapore and Cape Town .

Orbis’ programs emphasize skills, training and self-sufficiency . The organization spends approximately a year planning and coordinating with partner hospitals and local organizations. [5] The Flying Eye Hospital not only provides training, but also provides medical and surgical support to the local medical teams. [6] It ensures that other patients who are in need of treatment are able to get treatment. Cybersight , Orbis telemedicine program, continuing training and mentoringFlying Eye Hospital has the program. [7] Orbis’ intervention is tailored to local needs; Orbis trains local doctors in low-tech, low-cost yet effective methods to correct diseases of the eyes. [8]

In addition to the Flying Eye Hospital, Orbis operates in a number of hospitals and clinics.

Orbis is a founding partner, along with the World Health Organization , of VISION 2020 : The Right to Sight, “a concerted effort designed to eliminate harmful blindness by the 2020 year.”

History

Orbis was founded in 1982 with a grant from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and a number of private donors. The first Flying Eye Hospital was a Douglas DC-8 -21 (N220RB) donated by United Airlines . In his first two years of operation, the Orbis DC-8 visited 24 countries and held programs emphasizing the hands-on transfer of surgical skills.

By the late 1980s, as replacement parts for aging DC-8 became more difficult and more expensive. Funded by private donations, published in DC-10 in 1992. The DC-10 contains twice the original DC-8 space. After two years of conversion and renovation, it was placed in service in 1994, and the DC-8 was retired and donated to Datangshan museum near Beijing . That summer, the new Flying Eye Hospital took off on its inaugural mission to Beijing , China.

In 1998, Orbis embarked on a new path based on the strategy to strengthen the capacity of local partners in the developing world to prevent and treat blindness through full-time, ongoing in-country programs. These programs were designed to respond to the needs of individual ophthalmic communities and local eye care providers. Orbis selected the first round of countries based on need (magnitude of blindness), opportunity (local infrastructure and resources), and safety & stability to operate in-country.

Orbis launched its first permanent country program in Ethiopia . Country programs in Bangladesh , China , India and Vietnam soon followed. In 2010 Orbis established a country program office in South Africa . Permanent Orbis offices in these countries, run by local staff, develop and implement an array of multi-year projects to improve the quality and accessibility of care to residents, particularly in rural areas and impoverished urban communities. In addition to permanent country offices Orbis aussi engaged in long-term program work in Several countries in Latin America and the Caribbean as well is in countries IncludingNepal , Zambia , and Burkina Faso .

On April 7, 2008, Orbis announced it would replace its current DC-10 Flying Eye Hospital with a DC-10 Series 30 freighter. United Airlines , with the support of FedEx , is donating the airplane to Orbis. The $ 2 million donation is based on the plan and is valued by United and FedEx.

On August 8, 2011, FedEx announced that it would donate one of its DC-10-30s, retrofitted with the MD-10-30F upgrade, to Orbis to replace its DC-10-30F. The new MD-10 will feature a modular hospital suite, the first time these units will be used on an aircraft. [9]

In 2012, Orbis Celebrated its 30th Anniversary of Saving Sight Worldwide.

The Orbis Flying Eye Hospital

Orbis is well known for its ” Flying Eye Hospital ,” an ophthalmic hospital and teaching facility located on board MD-10 aircraft. The Flying Eye Hospital Brings training to doctors and nurses in developing countries with little access to professional development and training. Classrooms, operating theaters and laser rooms are aboard the plane and the local medical staff are able to watch live surgeries and simulations . [10] 3D filming and broadcasting facilities allow the local ophthalmic professionals to observe the live surgeries through the eyes of the surgeon. [7]Surgeries can also be broadcast to additional classes outside the aircraft, be it a local hospital or halfway across the world. Participants can ask questions via a two-way audio-visual system. [11] Volunteer pilots donate their time and skills to the various programs. [6]

In June 2016, Orbis reveals its third generation Flying Eye Hospital. The hospital is a converted McDonnell Douglas DC-10 donated by FedEx and can fly twice as long as its predecessor. It is similar to a land-based hospital and is outfitted with safety features such as back-up generator and early warning monitoring systems. [12] The hospital also has its own water treatment plant and air conditioning systems . [13] It also houses a 46-seat classroom, which allows participants to observe surgeries while they are taking place. [14]

Orbis’s previous DC-10-10 has since been donated to the Pima Air & Space Museum . It arrived at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in November 2016 [15] and is currently under restoration.

Country Programs

In addition to the Flying Eye Hospital, Orbis operates long-term programs and collaborates with local governments and organizations. [8] It has worked with local universities and healthcare institutions to provide local partners with training. [1]

In each country, Orbis works with its local partner institutions to increase their ability to provide comprehensive, affordable and sustainable services over the long term. The programs include developing specialized hospital facilities, eye banks , patient and health care worker training, and prevention and treatment programs. [16]

In 2015 alone, more than 30,000 medical professionals were trained and more than 2 million patients were screened at Flying Eye Hospital or at its partner institutions. [12]

Cybersight

Cybersight ( https://cybersight.org/ ) is a telemedicine that allows eye health workers in low- and middle-income countries to consult with experts in their field, free of charge. Mentors give their opinion on patient cases, share learning materials, and help local eye health workers develop their skills in blindness treatment and prevention. Since its launch, more than 10,000 electronic cases have taken place. [17] This allows for distance learning and discussion, and ensures that the local medical teams of the various programs are able to benefit from Orbis’ services even after the Flying Eye Hospital has left the site.

Cybersight also offers regular live readings , a library of educational materials and allows users to take tests and receive certificates of achievement. [18]

References

  1. ^ Jump up to:b “Orbis International | International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness” . Iapb.org . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  2. Jump up^ “Archived copy” . Archived from the original on 2013-08-06 . Retrieved 2013-08-06 .
  3. ^ Jump up to:b “Rating for ORBIS International” . Charity Navigator . Retrieved 2016-12-14 .
  4. Jump up^ “Orbis International Project, Inc. – GuideStar Profile” . Guidestar.org . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  5. Jump up^ “High-tech ‘Flying Eye Hospital’ visits Silicon Valley ‘ . Mercurynews.com . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  6. ^ Jump up to:b “Eye in the Sky: FedEx Third-Gen Debut Orbis Flying Eye Hospital” . Memphisdailynews.com . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  7. ^ Jump up to:a UK b , Orbis. “Cindy Crawford Orbis Unveils New Plane to Blindness Fight / PR Newswire UK /” . Prnewswire.co.uk . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  8. ^ Jump up to:b “With Its Flying Hospital, This Group Is Saving The World From Blindness” . Fastcomapny.com . 2016-07-15 . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  9. Jump up^ “News Channel | Homepage” . Flightglobal.com . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  10. Jump up^ “Doctors on the move: Getting healthcare to far-flung places” . BBC News . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  11. Jump up^ “ORBIS Flying Eye Hospital | The Center for Health Market Innovations” . Healthmarketinnovations.org . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  12. ^ Jump up to:b “Flying Eye Hospital Focuses is teaching physicians in other countries” . Sacbee.com . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  13. Jump up^ “Orbis International’s Flying Eye Hospital trains UC Davis specialists – Sacramento Business Journal” . Bizjournals.com . Retrieved 2016-08-23.
  14. Jump up^ “Orbis Sees Opportunity with Third-Generation Flying Eye Hospital” . APEX | Airline Passenger Experience . 2016-06-03 . Retrieved 2016-08-23.
  15. Jump up^ Wilson, William. “Pima Space Museum to get DC-10 that served as flying eye hospital” . Arizona Daily Star . Retrieved 18 November 2017 .
  16. Jump up^ “Orbis” . Orbis . Retrieved 2016-12-14 .
  17. Jump up^ “Cyber-Sight | The Center for Health Market Innovations” . Healthmarketinnovations.org . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  18. Jump up^ “ORBIS Program: Cyber-sight” . V2020la.org . Retrieved 2016-08-23 .
  • Salewicz, Chris (9 February 2008). “Oliver Foot: President of Orbis International, the world’s only flying eye hospital” . The Independent .

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